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  • Evaluation & Management 2.0: 2021 E/M Guidelines for Dermatology - March 6th

    This course covers the most significant change in 25 years for documenting new and established patient visits. Analyze the differences between billing based on Medical Decision Making and Time.

    Evaluation & Management 2.0: 2021 E/M Guidelines for Dermatology

    Date and Time

    Saturday, March 6, 2021 | 10:00 AM Central Time

    The Course

    This 2.5-hour course analyzes the 2021 CPT E/M guidelines and presents them in the distilled understandable format for which KZA is known. Building on what providers are currently doing, the restructured elements of Medical Decision Making and Time are broken down and explained.

    There will be “hands-on” coding of E/M notes as well as plenty of time for Q&A.  Participants will have the opportunity to cement understanding and leave empowered with a “To-Do List” for a successful transition.

    Documentation Tips

    We will provide you with key documentation tips to optimize your coding and documentation. These tips can assist in building your electronic health record templates to adequately address the Medical Decision Making that takes place during an office visit. They will be used during the course to cement education points to prevent inadequate documentation.

    Audit Tool

    The audit tool is an edited version of the CPT guidelines restructured for easy use and education.  The course will use the tool to review notes and ‘score” them based on the MDM that is documented.

    • Gain a greater understanding of the overall 2021 changes to E/M, including the subtle nuances and reasons behind the revisions
    • Understand the revised times and Medical Decision Making processes for all office-based E/M codes effective Jan. 1, 2021
    • Learn what the performance of history and exam “only as medically appropriate” means
    • Learn what activities can be counted when selecting the level of service based on time for 2021 office-based services
    • Understand revisions to code descriptors for 99202-99215 and which codes have been deleted
    • Understand the role of ancillary staff with the “patients over paperwork” theme throughout the new coding process

    Note: This course does not cover existing E/M guidelines which will be used, in 2021, for office consultation codes (9924x) and inpatient service codes.

    Learning Objectives
    • Name three elements required for Medical Decision Making in 2021 for new and established patient visit Evaluation and Management (E/M) codes.
    • Differentiate Time ranges and requirements in the current and 2021 E/M guidelines.
    • Apply the correct guidelines depending on the category of E/M service.

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    2020 AAPC Accreditation

    This program has the prior approval of AAPC for 3.0 continuing education hours. Granting of prior approval in no way constitutes endorsement by AAPC of the program content or the program sponsor. 

    Credit is available after the completion of an evaluation.

    Course Access 

    Once purchased you will receive an initial confirmation and additional emails approximately 1 week before the scheduled meeting. One with information on how to access the course and a second with course materials. The course materials will also be available to download here on the day of your meeting.

     Please email education@karenzupko.com if you have questions.

  • IHC Patient-Centered Communication Series: Advance Care Planning - Starting the Conversation

    Includes Credits

    This module will provide an overview of advance care planning specific to strategies for initiating the conversation with patients about advance directives. Advance care planning is the process of communication between an individual, his or her family, and clinicians or other caregivers, to clarify treatment preferences, identify a surrogate and develop goals for care in serious illness and near the end of life. Advance care planning aims to protect the wishes and goals of the individual so that when serious illness occurs, wishes are honored in concert with patient and family values and circumstances, as discussed or documented during the advance care planning process.

    Presented by:

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    About the IHC

    The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) has been a leader in healthcare communication skills training since 1987. IHC’s accredited programs advance the quality of healthcare, with measurable benefits for patient satisfaction, clinician career satisfaction, patient health outcomes and durable relationships of trust. 

    These modules are conducted in partnership with KarenZupko & Associates, Inc.
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    Overview

    This module will provide an overview of advance care planning specific to strategies for initiating the conversation with patients about advance directives. Advance care planning is the process of communication between an individual, his or her family, and clinicians or other caregivers, to clarify treatment preferences, identify a surrogate and develop goals for care in serious illness and near the end of life. 

    Advance care planning aims to protect the wishes and goals of the individual so that when serious illness occurs, wishes are honored in concert with patient and family values and circumstances, as discussed or documented during the advance care planning process.                   

    Rationale  

    Healthcare has advanced a great deal in the past 75 years. In just a few generations, we have seen the advent of antibiotics, antiseptic techniques for birth and surgery, the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and successful organ transplantation. An unforeseen consequence of more effective medical care and a resultant longer lifespan is the impact on how we die. 

    In the past, at the time of death, the family was present and death practices reflected the beliefs and culture of the community. Now, in present-day western societies, most deaths occur in a healthcare setting. Only 24 percent of Americans older than sixty-five die at home; 63 percent die in hospitals or nursing homes, sometimes tethered to machines, and often in pain (Volandes, 2016). The environment is often sterile, unfamiliar and family may or may not be present. In the most dramatic variation, the person dying is receiving intensive care and life support and often has been unresponsive or non-communicative for days or weeks in advance of their death. These settings offer little comfort to the families, as there is often no time for activities of closure such as last acts, blessings or goodbyes. 

    Research shows, not surprisingly, that families who experience the death of a loved one under such circumstances are more likely to experience complications or prolonged grief and regret.

    Why are we now more than ever at risk for a death we would not choose: alone, institutionalized and perhaps in pain? The answer includes these interrelated things:

     

    ·       Our medical care has advanced to such an extent that it is “easy” to prolong someone’s life

    ·       The evolution of medical care has increased the complexity of end-of-life care decisions

    ·       Many people never discuss their end-of-life care wishes, leaving others to guess what they would want

     

    Like all of IHC CME live and virtual workshops, Advance Care Planning: Starting the Conversation provides an evidence-based and engaging educational experience for learners to learn and practice specific communication skills for immediate practice application. 


    Content

    Conversations surrounding advance care planning often take on a special significance and it is through compassionate communication that clinicians form a connection with their patients, elicit information about their values and goals, and establish plans and interventions with them for moving forward. 

     Yet, even when caring for long-time patients, it can be challenging to get the conversation started if it has not been raised before. Patients will often wonder why this topic is coming up now. Your ability to connect and share how advance care planning will be beneficial for your patient promotes honest dialogue about specific healthcare needs, values and goals.  Providing this information and eliciting the patient's concerns and priorities improves their understanding and insight about the importance of taking steps to participate in advance care planning. This collaboration and mutual respect heightens your ability to partner with your patient and increases patient satisfaction, as well as your intrinsic reward as a clinician.   

    Similar to starting conversations about other sensitive topics, a guiding point is to learn to ask more than tell, so begin with an attitude of discovery and curiosity. This module provides openers for clinicians to start the discussion by asking some questions that invite the patient or family member to provide important information. This also requires the ability to be an active or empathic listener. Not only do we gain more information with active listening, but we also demonstrate respect for the patient's concerns and feelings being expressed.  


    If you have not had formal training, and have relied upon clinical experience, you are not alone. For those of you who have had formal training or have had years of experience, it is our hope that this module will reinforce and add to your learning. Learners will be introduced to a practice-friendly model with sample scripts that can be customized to each clinician’s style. 

    As with all IHC communication workshops, an annotated bibliography is available. We encourage you to use the bibliography after the module as a resource for further professional development on patient-centred communication.

    Learning Objectives

    1.     Identify at least two barriers to engaging in Advance Directive (AD) conversations with patients. 

    2.    Practice statements and/or questions for opening up the AD conversation with a patient. 

    3.     Apply at least one communication technique from the N-E-E-D model such as empathy to respond to patient/family emotions

    4.     Identify resources to meet the Advance Directive needs of your patients 

     

    Methodology                                                                                               

    Advance Directives: Starting the Conversation module is available in this one-hour CME and self-paced virtual format and can also be available in a 2 hour live virtual or in-person format, upon request. The latter version is fast-paced and interactive, with a strong focus on opportunities to practice skills and techniques in a safe and structured environment. 


    CME/CE

    The Institute for Healthcare Communication is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. IHC takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CE/CME activity. Advance Directives: Starting the Conversation is designated by the Institute for Healthcare Communication as a continuing medical education activity meeting the criteria for up to three hours in Category 1 of the Physician’s Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. 

    For further information, please contact:

    Institute for Healthcare Communication www.healthcarecomm.org

    info@healthcarecomm.org

    Kathleen Bonvicini

    MPH, EdD

    Kathleen Bonvicini serves as the CEO/Executive Director of IHC since 2009. Dr. Bonvicini began her work in clinician-patient communication in 1999 and has developed and delivered many of IHC’s communication workshops and provides train-the-trainer programs to clinicians and healthcare professionals in human and veterinary medicine throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, Australia, South America and Oman. She has conducted and published her research in the area of empathic connection specific to physician empathy with patients and many other important topics which encourage relationship-centered care. In addition, she has written and presented extensively to an international audience including practitioners, opinion leaders, students, academicians, healthcare professionals and consumers on the importance of communication training in healthcare. She is also a trained Mediator and End-of-Life Doula and volunteers her time with home hospice care. Prior to her 20+ years of work with IHC, Kathleen had an impressive record of professional achievement, including fifteen years of experience in research and psychiatry at the Yale University - Veterans Administration Laboratory of Psychiatric Genetics and has worked as a social worker in the areas of adolescent pregnancy, law enforcement, and women's health, and university teaching in psychology and public health. 

     

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  • Colorectal Surgery Coding and Reimbursement Bundle

    Whether you’re a coder or a surgeon, understanding the codes and the necessary documentation will facilitate accurate and optimal revenue and RVU calculations; essential if you are a surgeon compensated by RVU production.

    Colorectal Surgery Coding and Reimbursement Bundle

    Coding for complex colorectal procedures? Scratching your head when trying to figure out which codes fit which procedures?  You’re not alone. Colorectal coding requires knowledge of the anatomy involved as well as specific terminology that describes the procedures performed.

    For surgeons, the CPT code description may not be consistent with the clinical language you are accustomed to using (or what’s included in the code selection list from your EHR!). For coders, knowing how a colostomy is different than a coloproctostomy, can be the difference between a correct code and an incorrect code, not to mention a difference in payment!

    Whether you’re a coder or a surgeon, understanding the codes and the necessary documentation will facilitate accurate and optimal revenue and RVU calculations; essential if you are a surgeon compensated by RVU production.  

    Join KZA consultant Teri Romano, in a webinar designed specifically for improving coding and documentation of colorectal procedures.  Presented in two interesting and information-packed modules, the modules can be viewed as a set or alone depending on your individual coding education needs. Case scenarios are included in each module to guide the real-life application of codes to surgical procedures.

    Module 1 will answer:

    • When are two surgeons co -surgeon and when are they primary and assistant? Does specialty matter?
    • What’s the difference between modifiers 58 and 78 and how are they used in colorectal procedures?
    • How is moderate sedation documented?
    • How is colonoscopy reported if the cecum is not visualized?
    • Can more than one polyp removal be reported?

    Module 2 will answer:

    • What’s included in colorectal surgery? What about an endoscope after the surgery to check the anastomoses? What about an omental flap?
    • How is a low pelvic anastomosis with a diverting ileostomy instead of a colostomy reported?
    • What does a hand-assisted procedure mean and how is it reported?
    • What differentiates a simple versus complex destructions of anal lesions?
    • What’s the difference between a fistula and a fissure?

  • Colorectal Surgery Coding and Reimbursement - Module 2

    Part 2 of a two-part series on colorectal coding and reimbursement.

    This 50-minute module will answer:
    • What’s included in a colorectal surgery? What about an endoscope after the surgery to check the anastomoses? What about an omental flap?
    • How is a low pelvic anastomosis with a diverting ileostomy instead of a colostomy reported?
    • What does a hand-assisted procedure mean and how is it reported?
    • What differentiates a simple versus complex destructions of anal lesions?
    • What’s the difference between a fistula and a fissure?

    Teri Romano, BSN, MBA, CPC, CMDP

    Speaker and Consultant

    Teri Romano has over twenty-five years of consulting and teaching experience in the health care field. Ms. Romano works with physician groups and hospitals combining a background in clinical systems with solid approaches to operational and organizational problem solving.

    Find out about more about Teri Romano, RN, MBA, CPC, CMDP

  • Successful Surgical Coding Workshop

    New codes, new guidelines! The 2020 ACS surgical procedure coding course sifts through all that is new and important in general surgery coding and packs it into an intensive, fast-paced six and a half hours. This year's agenda covers all you need to know to code and document accurately and efficiently in 2020 and beyond.

    Total Runtime: 6 Hours 27 Minutes

    New codes, new guidelines! The 2020 ACS surgical procedure coding course sifts through all that is new and important in general surgery coding and packs it into an intensive, fast-paced six and a half hours. This year's agenda covers all you need to know to code and document accurately and efficiently in 2020 and beyond.

    Real-life cases and discussions that link clinical procedures to the selection of CPT codes make this course ideal for surgeons and coding staff. Forget boring slides and a mind-numbing list of CPT codes. This course is rich with clinical scenarios and a comprehensive workbook that will become your first-response coding resource.

    The course provides in-depth and interesting instruction on coding for endoscopy, colorectal, breast, hernia, appendix, gall bladder, liver, intraabdominal tumor, pancreatic, and endocrine procedures. 

    The course describes why documentation is as essential as the code selected and how to capture all potential revenue by improving your notes. We'll show you the correct way to use surgical payment modifiers so that you optimize payment. You'll leave armed with ideas and techniques for setting up systems that reduce denials and increase successful appeals. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Distinguish different categories of codes and how payment differs
    • Describe what is included in a global surgical package and what can be reported separately
    • Distinguish what surgical modifier to report
    • Describe documentation requirements for unlisted codes
    • Demonstrate correct coding and documentation for radiology services
    • Describe coding for different surgical approaches Identify when to report mesh and reinforcement implants
    • Demonstrate correct coding for a variety of general surgery procedures

    Package Access and Expiration

    You will have access to this package for 60 days from the day you purchase it.

    You will have 30 days to complete the course within the package. 

    The 30 days for this course starts the day you activate the course within the package.

    Please note, if you start the course with less than 30 days left in the package access period (60 days from the time of purchase) you will only have until the end of that period.


    Should you have questions, please contact us at education@karenzupko.com  

    Presented by:

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  • Intensive Trauma and Critical Care Coding Workshop

    ​A full day devoted to trauma surgery and critical care coding! You asked for it, we're delivering it. This information-packed course goes narrow and deep into the distinct coding issues faced by trauma and critical care providers.

    A full day devoted to trauma surgery and critical care coding! You asked for it, we're delivering it. This information-packed course goes narrow and deep into the distinct coding issues faced by trauma and critical care providers: learn the granularities of the relevant global surgical packages; gain the know-how for choosing the correct modifier to report surgeon role, same-day surgical procedure, and surgical procedures performed within the global period; and get all of the details needed to code and document an array of common procedures in a trauma and critical care environment, including: emergent procedures, abdominal and thoracic trauma, damage control surgery, wound care, imaging, and vessel repair. 

    This year we've expanded the critical care section to almost an entire afternoon that will leave you confident about your critical care documentation and coding. Case scenarios will help you identify which critical care circumstances support critical care reporting and how to create documentation that will hold up under scrutiny. 

    We'll also describe when resident or NP/PA documentation and time count in your critical care calculation. This course connects clinical procedures to the selection of CPT codes making it ideal for surgeons and coding staff.

    Package Access and Expiration

    You will have access to this package for 60 days from the day you purchase it.

    You will have 30 days to complete the course within the package. 

    The 30 days for this course starts the day you activate the course within the package.

    Please note, if you start the course with less than 30 days left in the package access period (60 days from the time of purchase) you will only have until the end of that period.


    Should you have questions, please contact us at education@karenzupko.com  

    Presented by:

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  • Successful Surgical Coding & Intensive Trauma and Critical Care Coding Bundle

    Get both Successful Surgical Coding & Intensive Trauma and Critical Care Coding in a convenient bundle.

    Get both Successful Surgical Coding & Intensive Trauma and Critical Care Coding in a convenient bundle.

    Package Access and Expiration

    You will have access to this package for 60 days from the day you purchase it.

    You will have 30 days to complete each individual course within the package. 

    The 30 days for a course start the day you activate that course within the package.

    Please note, if you start an individual course with less than 30 days left in the package access period (60 days from the time of purchase) you will only have until the end of that period.


    Should you have questions, please contact us at education@karenzupko.com  

    Presented by:

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  • Clinician-Patient Communication for Virtual Video Visits: E2 Empathize With Your Patients

    Includes Credits

    This course is based on IHC’s evidence-based E4 Communication Model (Engage, Empathize, Educate, Enlist). This module is the second E of the E4 Model: E2 - Empathize with your patient. This module presents scientific evidence demonstrating that clinician’s empathic communication leads to increased patient satisfaction, adherence and health outcomes.

    Presented by:

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    About the IHC

    The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) has been a leader in healthcare communication skills training since 1987. IHC’s accredited programs advance the quality of healthcare, with measurable benefits for patient satisfaction, clinician career satisfaction, patient health outcomes and durable relationships of trust. 

    These modules are conducted in partnership with KarenZupko & Associates, Inc.
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    Michael R. Marks

    MD, MBA, FAAOS

    Dr. Marks is multi-faceted physician and business executive who brings more than 30 years of expertise drawing from his broad leadership experiences.

    Dr. Marks is a Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon, having completed his orthopaedic residency atGeorge Washington University and spine fellowshipat the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He was the Vice President of Business Development for Norwalk Hospital in Connecticut and is currently the Senior Medical Director of Relievant MedSystems. In 2001, he obtained his MBA from the University of Tennessee to acquire the skills necessary to meet the healthcare challenges of the 21st Century.

    For more than 15 years, he has been a communications mentor for the Institute for Healthcare Communications providing instruction in three communication skill courses (Clinician-Patient Communication, Strangers in Crisis, and Disclosing Unanticipated Medical Outcomes) including the development of virtual video visits (telemedicine) webinars that are necessary for today’s clinicians.

    Dwight W. Burney III, MD, FAAOS

    Speaker

    Dr. Burney retired after 34 years of orthopedicpractice in New Mexico. For more the past 14 yearshe has been a communication skills trainer for theInstitute for Healthcare Communication.

    He has served the American Academy of OrthopaedicSurgeons in multiple roles - as Chair of the Board ofCouncilors, Chair of the Membership Committee,and Chair of the Communication Skills MentoringProgram. He also served served for three years on theAAOS Board of Directors as well as the Patient SafetyCommittee.

    Dr. Burney graduated with a BA degree in BiologicSciences from Stanford University. He returned to hishome state to attend medical school at the Universityof Nebraska Medical Center. His surgical internshipat the University of Missouri was followed by anorthopaedic surgery residency at the University ofNew Mexico and an orthopaedic trauma fellowship atthe University of Washington. He was certified by theAmerican Board of Orthopaedic Surgery in 1983.

    He was a founding partner in New MexicoOrthopaedic Associates, the largest orthopaedicsubspecialty practice in New Mexico. He also servedas President and Treasurer for the New MexicoOrthopaedic Association.

    Accreditation: The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME/CE activity. IHC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Institute for Healthcare Communication designates the Clinician-Patient Communication to Enhance Health Outcomes for Virtual Video Visits (CPC for VVV): E2 Empathize With Your Patients for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    2020 CME Credit for Physicians: This activity has been approved for 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM

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  • Clinician-Patient Communication for Virtual Video Visits - E4 Model

    Includes Credits

    This course is based on IHC’s evidence-based E4 Communication Model. Through brief presentations, demonstration videos, and engaging learning techniques, each module will delve into the E4 model (Engage, Empathize, Educate, Enlist) to increase clinicians’ comfort and confidence in VVV interactions.

    Presented by:

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    About the IHC

    The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) has been a leader in healthcare communication skills training since 1987. IHC’s accredited programs advance the quality of healthcare, with measurable benefits for patient satisfaction, clinician career satisfaction, patient health outcomes and durable relationships of trust. 

    These modules are conducted in partnership with KarenZupko & Associates, Inc.
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    Learn about the more than three decades of research evidence that demonstrates a clinician’s ability to explain, listen and empathize can have a profound effect on patient health outcomes including diagnostic accuracy, adherence, satisfaction and malpractice risk. While telemedicine using virtual video visits (VVV) has historically been used to enhance healthcare access for patients living in rural and remote areas, we are now seeing exponential growth of VVV.

    Virtual visits have multiple advantages including ensuring patients’ and providers’ safety from viral infection and offer advantages with respect to time- and cost-saving. Clinicians and patients may be concerned that virtual visits impose obstacles to personal connections. Using VVV can still remain a personal experience by using essential communication skills that include listening to patients, providing adequate time for patient questioning, investing time in building patient rapport and emphasizing patient input into decision-making.

    Reasons why you should enroll in this IHC series:

    • Virtual video visits are here to stay! In addition to ensuring continuity of care and safety for all, they are convenient, flexible and time-efficient for patients and providers.
    • Improve patient satisfaction: Learn about the foundational skills in the E4 communication model that help patients to feel seen, heard and understood, and to participate in decision-making.
    • Expand your clinical communication toolkit: Strengthen your communication skills and acquire new tools and techniques to make virtual video visits optimally effective and efficient.
    • Gain telemedicine confidence: Learn technical and communication skills to address common telemedicine challenges and apply nonverbal techniques to enhance your patient interactions. 

    Michael R. Marks, MD, MBA

    Consultant and Speaker

    Dr. Marks is an innovative problem solver who brings more than 30 years of practical experience to each engagement. He draws on his broad leadership experiences as a clinician, administrator, and physician executive when working with clients. He fully understands the need for collaborative relationships to achieve success and create win-win solutions.

    Find out more about Michael R. Marks, MD, MBA


    Dwight W. Burney III, MD, FAAOS

    Speaker

    Dr. Burney retired after 34 years of orthopedicpractice in New Mexico. For more the past 14 yearshe has been a communication skills trainer for theInstitute for Healthcare Communication.

    He has served the American Academy of OrthopaedicSurgeons in multiple roles - as Chair of the Board ofCouncilors, Chair of the Membership Committee,and Chair of the Communication Skills MentoringProgram. He also served served for three years on theAAOS Board of Directors as well as the Patient SafetyCommittee.

    Dr. Burney graduated with a BA degree in BiologicSciences from Stanford University. He returned to hishome state to attend medical school at the Universityof Nebraska Medical Center. His surgical internshipat the University of Missouri was followed by anorthopaedic surgery residency at the University ofNew Mexico and an orthopaedic trauma fellowship atthe University of Washington. He was certified by theAmerican Board of Orthopaedic Surgery in 1983.

    He was a founding partner in New MexicoOrthopaedic Associates, the largest orthopaedicsubspecialty practice in New Mexico. He also servedas President and Treasurer for the New MexicoOrthopaedic Association.

    If you are having trouble with certain features or if videos are not loading properly please check what web browser you are using. If you are using Internet Explorer as your web browser you may encounter additional issues as it is no longer supported by Microsoft.  We suggest using Microsoft Edge, Chrome, or Safari.

    If you have any questions about the contents of this product or the Institute for Healthcare Communications (IHC) please email us at info@healthcarecomm.org.

  • Clinician-Patient Communication for Virtual Video Visits: E1 Engage Your Patients

    Includes Credits

    The module content offers a close examination and use of the tools and techniques to build patient rapport starting with welcoming rituals, coaching your patient through the technology, time-saving agenda setting, and summarizing. Finally, a simulated clinician-patient virtual video visit is shown for learners to identify effective clinician communication skills specific to E1 (Engage your patient).

    Presented by:

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    About the IHC

    The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) has been a leader in healthcare communication skills training since 1987. IHC’s accredited programs advance the quality of healthcare, with measurable benefits for patient satisfaction, clinician career satisfaction, patient health outcomes and durable relationships of trust. 

    These modules are conducted in partnership with KarenZupko & Associates, Inc.
    image

    Michael R. Marks (Moderator)

    MD, MBA, FAAOS

    Dr. Marks is multi-faceted physician and business executive who brings more than 30 years of expertise drawing from his broad leadership experiences.

    Dr. Marks is a Board-Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon, having completed his orthopaedic residency atGeorge Washington University and spine fellowshipat the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He was the Vice President of Business Development for Norwalk Hospital in Connecticut and is currently the Senior Medical Director of Relievant MedSystems. In 2001, he obtained his MBA from the University of Tennessee to acquire the skills necessary to meet the healthcare challenges of the 21st Century.

    For more than 15 years, he has been a communications mentor for the Institute for Healthcare Communications providing instruction in three communication skill courses (Clinician-Patient Communication, Strangers in Crisis, and Disclosing Unanticipated Medical Outcomes) including the development of virtual video visits (telemedicine) webinars that are necessary for today’s clinicians.

    Dwight W. Burney III, MD, FAAOS

    Speaker

    Dr. Burney retired after 34 years of orthopedicpractice in New Mexico. For more the past 14 yearshe has been a communication skills trainer for theInstitute for Healthcare Communication.

    He has served the American Academy of OrthopaedicSurgeons in multiple roles - as Chair of the Board ofCouncilors, Chair of the Membership Committee,and Chair of the Communication Skills MentoringProgram. He also served served for three years on theAAOS Board of Directors as well as the Patient SafetyCommittee.

    Dr. Burney graduated with a BA degree in BiologicSciences from Stanford University. He returned to hishome state to attend medical school at the Universityof Nebraska Medical Center. His surgical internshipat the University of Missouri was followed by anorthopaedic surgery residency at the University ofNew Mexico and an orthopaedic trauma fellowship atthe University of Washington. He was certified by theAmerican Board of Orthopaedic Surgery in 1983.

    He was a founding partner in New MexicoOrthopaedic Associates, the largest orthopaedicsubspecialty practice in New Mexico. He also servedas President and Treasurer for the New MexicoOrthopaedic Association.

    Accreditation: The Institute for Healthcare Communication (IHC) takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME/CE activity. IHC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Institute for Healthcare Communication designates the Clinician-Patient Communication to Enhance Health Outcomes for Virtual Video Visits (CPC for VVV): E1 Engage Patients for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    2020 CME Credit for Physicians: This activity has been approved for 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM

    image

    If you are having trouble with certain features or if videos are not loading properly please check what web browser you are using. If you are using Internet Explorer as your web browser you may encounter additional issues as it is no longer supported by Microsoft.  We suggest using Microsoft Edge, Chrome, or Safari.